Photo Project: First Snow…

Mild temperatures here in New England made November and December feel more like an early spring than a precursor to winter. On Christmas Day, it reached sixty degrees (Fahrenheit)! The wind blew the leaves around quite a bit, but no snow fell.

Can you see our lovely raking job in November between the first and second photos above? If you look closely at the second one, you’ll spy one of many leaf piles waiting to be bagged…or jumped into. ; ) The last photo shows how green the lawn remained, even at the end of November, due to the moderate temps.

Instead of snow, we had plenty of rain! The combination of wet weather and mild temps resulted in a few foggy mornings.

Then, finally, on December 29th, it snowed.

It wasn’t much snow. And you can see that it’s fading away – on the lawn anyway. Today, January 5th, New England weather caught up to the calendar and the temperature plummeted. It was 12 degrees when I took that final photo above.

Maybe it really is winter…we’ll see how much more snow there is to come. This project will wrap up at the end of January with a few last photographs and a list of what I’ve learned (or what I’d do differently next time:)).

To those of you in this Northern hemisphere…Have a Wonderful Winter!!! (And the rest of you, enjoy the sun!)

Photo Project: Summer Into Fall…

It’s been a while since my last installment of this Photo Project. Life got busy and the trees, well, they stayed green all summer!

The scene outside my window didn’t change much, but I think some of the settings on my camera may have been altered. (Oops!) I went on vacation, probably tweaked some settings and then couldn’t remember the original ones. As a result, the color differences in the August and September photos above may be technical and not physical. Oh, well! Live and learn.

In October, I dare say that the subtle foliage changes were a bit disappointing. The maple tree on the left side of this view usually explodes in a brilliant red every autumn. But I don’t think it ever fully recovered from that worm attack in the spring.

Its ragged leaves managed a rusty red, while the trees just to the right of my chosen view showed off their own magic!

But, back to the scene I chose to observe…

From mid-October until the last week of the month, the colors morphed. (Pardon my lens hood crowding the corners!)

Then, on October 29th, it happened: FALL!!!

As the calendar turned to November, the wind took more and more leaves down, stripping most of the trees bare.

The end of the year brings with it the promise of trees covered in snow and ice. I’ll keep shooting and wrap up this project in January 2016, bringing it full circle from the blizzard of January 27, 2015 seen in my first Photo Project entry.

In the meantime, I’ve got some leaves to rake…

 

The Foliage Is Always Redder . . .

IMG_0218 2Autumn is a season of change. The daylight hours shorten, the nights become cooler, and school is back in session. Actually, for the first time since 1989, no one in my own household headed back to school this September. That in itself signifies change. But here in New England, beautiful foliage displays are the most celebrated change of all.

Several years ago, on an October drive to visit one of my daughters attending a Vermont college, I was blown away by the brilliance of color. Wave after wave of reds, oranges, and yellows bloomed before me as I drove the hills and curves of Interstate Routes 93 and 89. Ever since that drive, I’ve wanted to take a leaf-peeping adventure every year. And living just 30 minutes south of the New Hampshire border, you’d think I’d have done it every year. But no. Fall is a busy time of year and weekends are precious. Last year, my husband and I planned ahead to combine a foliage trip with an Alchemist Brewery truck sale. Guess what! It rained. Hard. Of course, we got the beer, but the sightseeing was a bust!

This year, every weekend seems to be booked. Life, as usual, has gotten busy. But I’ve been thinking. The old saying that “the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence” could be tweaked to say: “the foliage is always redder, oranger (I know, not really a word), and yellower on the other side of the border.” It’s all about perspective. We really don’t need to climb the fence or cross the border to find the vibrancy. We just need to change our thinking and open our eyes. So, I did.

And here’s some of what I found less than a mile from home…

And also less than a mile from home is a soccer field at which I spent many an autumn as a busy, distracted soccer mom. I hardly ever stopped to appreciate the view. This year, I decided to track the changing colors. The first photo was taken on September 21st. The last one was taken this morning. Enjoy!

Winter Recedes…

It’s April 3rd, Good Friday, and it’s 67º outside my window. Spring has arrived and winter is slowly receding from New England. It has left it’s mark. Below, a previously globe-shaped bush has flattened under the weight of the snow…DSC_0207The poor young Honeycrisp apple tree took a beating…

And I neglected to cut back the hibiscus…but the snow took care of that for me.

DSC_0237One of the butterfly bushes bowed under pressure…

DSC_0263The plows mercilessly shoved the curbing aside…

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And something burrowed under it all…

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But there are happy signs, too. The forsythia bush is budding…

And the tulips are poking through…

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But, best of all…MY SEED POTATO ARRIVED IN THE MAIL!!!!!

DSC_0273Welcome, spring, welcome!